Our Stories » Archives » November 2015

Maurizio Albahari: How do liberal democracies deal with newcomers?

Gene Stowe

For Maurizio Albahari, an assistant professor of anthropology and native of Italy, this year’s refugee crisis in Europe is a new layer on an old story of deadly immigration efforts across the Mediterranean Sea from Africa and Asia to Europe.  The experience also bears considerable analogs with American migration issues, Albahari says, although especially in the Mediterranean situation, a fence...

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Marc Burdell named program director, Low Socioeconomic Status support

Ann Hastings

Burdell will oversee the creation of a student life enrichment program under the Fighting Irish Initiative, a groundbreaking initiative that will fully fund the cost for low-income students to attend Notre Dame — including tuition and fees, room and board, books, transportation and personal expenses. 

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Rev. Jenkins urges dialogue at Vatican's Congregation for Catholic Education

Paul Browne

Invited by the Vatican’s Congregation for Catholic Education to a meeting of Catholic educators from around the world at the papal retreat at Castel Gandolfo near Rome, University of Notre Dame President Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., on Thursday (Nov. 19) cited Pope Francis and the late Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., president emeritus of Notre Dame, in urging that...

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Karen Richman: ‘We are a nation of immigrants’

Gene Stowe

Karen Richman, director of undergraduate studies for the Institute for Latino Studies, was one of the first scholars who saw both sides of immigration as it created transnational interdependent communities in the late 20th century. Her long-view historical perspective sees the current U.S. immigration debate as another in a long series of resistance followed by acceptance as newcomers contribute to...

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Soundreef internship bolsters Rome study abroad semester

Costanza Montanari

  Senior Mary-Catherine McRoskey, who studied abroad in Rome for spring 2015, leveraged her study abroad internship to gain professional experience while exploring academic and personal interests.  Notre Dame’s vision for a robust study abroad experience includes rigorous engagement inside the classroom as well as outside of it, the latter often taking the form of internships.

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Rahul Oka: Advocating for refugees in Kenya

Carol Bradley

Anthropologist Rahul Oka has been working with UNHCR and the World Bank on a new refugee camp being built, helping create a template for refugee resettlement. “All the data we’ve collected, both qualitative and quantitative, will inform the new camp. My job is not to tell them that they need a paradigm shift. My job is to make sure that...

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Catholic intellectual life: Student perspectives

Todd Boruff and Mary Haley

For students in the College of Arts and Letters, the unparalleled liberal arts education they receive is grounded in and enhanced by the Catholic intellectual life fostered on campus. Catholicism is an essential part of courses that every student takes, such as theology and philosophy, but it also serves as a background for all fields of study, from analyzing the...

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Alex Chávez: Parallels among Latino, Mideast and North African migration

Gene Stowe

Alex E. Chávez, an assistant professor in anthropology and Fellow of the Institute for Latino Studies (ILS), sees parallels between longstanding Latino migration to the United States and the current crisis of Middle Eastern and North African migration to Europe. He was part of a group of ILS faculty fellows who met with Italian scholars to discuss immigration at Notre...

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Sociologist’s research compares police presence at Christian and secular protests

William G. Gilroy

Police are less likely to show up at protests involving religious actors or organizations — unless the protesters are fundamentalist Christians, according to a new study. Notre Dame sociologist Kraig Beyerlein, the lead author of the study, analyzed protest-event data from daily editions of The New York Times published between 1960 and 1995 and found that, in general, police were...

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