Faculty Stories

Faculty at Notre Dame come from communities and cultures all over the world. They conduct research and scholarship on topics and issues that span numerous academic disciplines. They share with students not just their areas of expertise but also their questions and concerns about the enduring issues and latest developments that shape our times.

But their role in broadening and sharpening the lenses through which we understand ourselves and the world around us extend well beyond individual research projects, classroom lectures, course syllabi, or a list of academic programs.

The selection of stories below helps illustrate the many other ways Notre Dame faculty foster diversity, support inclusion, and enliven the entire Notre Dame community.

Holly Goodson elected as fellow of the American Society for Cell Biology

Rebecca Hicks

Holly Goodson, Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry, has been selected as a Fellow of The American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB). She joins 18 other distinguished scientists from across the globe in the 2023 cohort of fellows. Her formal recognition will take place in Boston later this year at Cell Bio 2023, the joint meeting of the ASCB and the...

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English language at ND: a bridge, a door, and a passion

Staff

The English language is a major lingua franca in today’s world–that is, a “bridge language” that two speakers of different languages can use to communicate with each other. For a variety of reasons, people from all across the world have chosen to devote their lives to studying English for themselves and teaching the language to others. One of those individuals...

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Ranjodh Singh Dhaliwal, professor of digital scholarship and English, explores ethical implications of technologies

Jon Hendricks

The concurrent assistant professor in the Department of Film, Television, and Theatre also makes video games, including Frack! The Game, a strategy contest that takes prompts from real-world incidents to explore the ethical, socioeconomic, and environmental landscape of injecting liquid at high pressure into the earth to force open fissures and then remove oil or gas.

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Notre Dame panel to shine light on current and historical significance of HBCUs

Jessica Sieff

When the University of Notre Dame hosts Tennessee State University (TSU) this weekend (Sept. 2), it will be the first time in program history the Irish will take to the field with a Historically Black College and University (HBCU). Several campus and community events are scheduled to commemorate the historic matchup — beginning with “The Historical and Current Significance of...

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Global works of art from Notre Dame Crucifix Initiative to be displayed at The History Museum

Carrie Gates

Selected works of art from the Crucifix Initiative will be on display in an exhibit on view starting Thursday (Aug. 10) at The History Museum in South Bend, Indiana. Launched in 2019, the initiative seeks to highlight the globalism of Catholicism — and to represent the diversity and internationalism of the University and its community — by building and displaying...

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To examine the US in the world, Perin Gürel puts diplomatic policy documents in conversation with cultural products

Jon Hendricks

“I might look at how a movie depicts Iran and how that movie is then interpreted in Turkey and how that relates to foreign policy, both Turkish foreign policy but also U.S. foreign policy and Iranian foreign policy,” said the associate professor of American studies.  The title of her in-progess book, America's Wife, America's Concubine: Turkey, Iran, and the Politics...

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Fighting for those with cystic fibrosis

What Would You Fight For

A collaboration between Notre Dame and Trinity College Dublin explores a novel method to treat cystic fibrosis. Eva Martin was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis at 3 weeks old. Though all babies are tested at birth in Ireland, Eva's symptoms began before the bloodwork was even processed. “She was hugely symptomatic at birth,” her mother, Bernie, recalls. Eva’s skin was peeling...

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Political scientist Rachel Porter earns award for best doctoral dissertation about American government

Beth Staples

The assistant professor analyzed text from more than 5,000 congressional candidates’ campaign websites in 2018 and 2020, and learned that while much of today’s politics is polarized and nationally oriented, theories of strategic candidate behavior also need to reflect locally oriented campaigning. “So, for instance, I find that candidates are a lot more likely to talk about local issues, district...

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Romance languages professor wins NEH grant for analysis and preservation of poet Rubén Darío’s influential work

Mary Kinney

María Rosa Olivera-Williams is leading a team of scholars from the U.S., England, and Argentina to analyze four volumes of Nicaraguan writer Rubén Darío lesser-known journalistic essays. She recently won an NEH Scholarly Editions and Translations grant, which will allow her to continue compiling, analyzing, and publicizing Darío’s work.

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Football weekend events center historic matchup with Tennessee State

Erin Blasko

Though distinct and celebrated universities in their own right, the values and histories of the University of Notre Dame and Tennessee State University align in many ways, including shared commitments to educational access and equity, civil rights, service and building community among students. That said, the two schools — one a leading Catholic research university, the other a historically Black...

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AI, robots, and the future of work: insights from economist Yong Suk Lee

Josh Stowe

As powerful technologies like artificial intelligence and robotics become widespread, so have worries about the future of work. Will these innovations make employees irrelevant and ultimately take their jobs? The good news is that they don’t have to. Policymakers can use education to leverage technology and build a better future for workers, says Yong Suk Lee…

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Paul Ocobock’s new book pores over history of Kenyan coffee

Jon Hendricks

“What I want from this book is for people to have a sense of, as the coffee machine is dripping the coffee into their pot … the long history of this beverage,” said the associate professor of history. After Kenya gained independence in 1963, Ocobock said farmers’ coffee production exploded. “We're so much more connected now to the people who...

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Notre Dame partners with Tennessee State and nine other HBCUs to grow the U.S. microelectronics workforce

Brett Beasley

When it comes to making semiconductor chips in the United States, “we need all hands on deck,” says Matthew Morrison, associate teaching professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Notre Dame. Morrison recently joined Apple’s Racial Equity and Justice Initiative. The initiative provides $50 million to support science, technology, engineering, arts, and math opportunities...

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Keough School of Global Affairs awarded for Urban Poverty and Business Initiative

Kirianna West

The McKenna Center for Human Development and Global Business, part of the Keough School of Global Affairs, received the 2023 Entrepreneurship Practice Award for its Urban Poverty and Business Initiative from the Academy of Management. The award recognizes research programs that are significantly advancing the practice of entrepreneurship.

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‘Powerful Conversations’ with TSU President Glenda Baskin Glover to explore race, gender and faith in leadership

Jessica Sieff

“Powerful Conversations,” a series hosted by Angela Logan, the St. Andre Bessette Academic Director of the Master of Nonprofit Administration Program and associate teaching professor at the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, will explore the importance of race, gender and faith to the work of leadership. Logan’s first guest is Glenda Baskin Glover, president of Tennessee State...

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New research offers solutions to improve drinking water access in developing countries

Shannon Roddel

New research from Alfonso Pedraza-Martinez, the Greg and Patty Fox Collegiate Professor of IT, Analytics and Operations in the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, examines the critical problem of drinking water access in rural areas of developing countries and recommends optimal locations to build new water projects.

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Shakespeare at Notre Dame to present ‘Hamlet 50/50,’ a new gender-balanced adaptation of the play

Carrie Gates

This week, the Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival Professional Company will debut “Hamlet 50/50,” a world-premiere adaptation of the play focused on creating a more gender-balanced and equitable production model. “Hamlet 50/50” will be performed in the Patricia George Decio Theatre in the University’s DeBartolo Performing Arts Center from Aug. 17 to 27.

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