Featured Events

Monday,
January 15

Candlelight Prayer Service

Main Building

To commemorate the life of Dr. King, the Notre Dame family is invited to a Candlelight Prayer Service on Monday, Jan. 15. Post-event (complimentary) late-night breakfast provided at South Dining Hall.

Prayer Service shuttle information

Tuesday,
January 16

Mindful Protest Student Workshop with Bree Newsome

138 DeBartolo Hall

Multicultural Student Programs and Services in partnership with the Center for Social Concerns and the Department of Africana Studies will welcome writer, activist, speaker, and filmmaker Bree Newsome to campus on Tuesday, Jan. 16. Ms. Newsome will facilitate a small student workshop about mindful protests before delivering a larger keynote address to the campus community.

More information

Information Session: Spring 2018 Social Concerns Seminars

Geddes Hall, McNeill Library

Social concerns seminars are academic courses that create opportunities for students to engage in social analysis, work with community partners around the country, and reflect on their experience and its impact on individuals and communities.

Attend an information session to learn more about the spring 2018 seminars.

Tearing Hatred from the Sky with Bree Newsome

101 DeBartolo Hall

Multicultural Student Programs and Services in partnership with the Center for Social Concerns and the Department of Africana Studies will welcome writer, activist, speaker, and filmmaker Bree Newsome to campus on Tuesday, Jan. 16. Ms. Newsome will deliver a keynote address to the campus community titled, "Tearing Hatred from the Sky." All are welcome to attend.

More information

Wednesday,
January 17

Information Session: Spring 2018 Social Concerns Seminars

Geddes Hall, McNeill Library

Social concerns seminars are academic courses that create opportunities for students to engage in social analysis, work with community partners around the country, and reflect on their experience and its impact on individuals and communities.

Attend an information session to learn more about the spring 2018 seminars.

National Museum of African American History & Culture Forum

Eck Center Auditorium

Please join the Department of Africana Studies panel discussion on fall break travel to Washington, D.C. to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture. The panel will include students and faculty. Refreshments available.

More Information

1968: When the World Changed Movies and Movies Changed the World

DeBartolo Performing Arts Center, Browning Cinema

This Learning Beyond the Classics Series offers the chance to view 14 films over the course of three months. The year 1968 stands as one of the most tumultuous in modern history. In the U.S., 1968 was marked by the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert Kennedy, by the escalation of the war in Vietnam, by protests in the streets and at national political conventions, and by an election that carried Richard Nixon back into power. Globally, civic protests in Paris nearly brought down the government, and the push against Soviet power created the Prague Spring, which ushered in political liberalization.

Media were intertwined with these events as media in various forms shifted radically. Television news in the U.S. expanded to 30 minutes and added color, and prime-time programs dramatized narratives that incorporated the civil rights movement and other social changes. In Hollywood, the studio system and decency codes that dominated American cinema since the 1930s dissolved as independent producers and documentarians pioneered new forms of storytelling and visual representation.

Learn more and purchase tickets here.

Thursday,
January 18

Information Session: Spring 2018 Social Concerns Seminars

Geddes Hall, McNeill Library

Social concerns seminars are academic courses that create opportunities for students to engage in social analysis, work with community partners around the country, and reflect on their experience and its impact on individuals and communities.

Attend an information session to learn more about the spring 2018 seminars.

3rd Thursdays @ the Snite / Connections: Art, Community, Action

Snite Museum of Art

Honor the life and legacy of Dr. King with a momentous community celebration. Join a unifying drum circle, talk with members of the community about their lives and the role that art plays in them, create a work of art that will bring beauty and healing into the world, and learn more about the history of and resources in your community.

Quest

DeBartolo Performing Arts Center, Browning Cinema

Filmed with vérité intimacy for almost a decade, this documentary is a longitudinal portrait of an American family living in North Philadelphia. Beginning at the dawn of the Obama presidency, parents Christopher "Quest" Rainey, and his wife, Christine'a "Ma Quest" Rainey, raise a family while navigating the poverty and strife that grips their neighborhood. They nurture a community of artists in their basement home music studio, but even this creative sanctuary can't always keep them safe from both local and more global pains. Epic in scope and seen by some as an American Apted film or a documentary parallel to Boyhood, the film is a vivid illumination of race and class in America, and a time-lapse picture of President Obama’s time in the White House.

Ticket information

Duncan Student Center Grand Opening

Duncan Student Center

ND students are invited to attend a grand opening event to celebrate the new Duncan Student Center from 8:30 p.m. to midnight. The event is being held in collaboration with Walk the Walk Week, and will feature a variety of multicultural student group performances and instructional entertainment in addition to taste testings, giveaways and facility tours. 

Friday,
January 19

A New Civil Rights Agenda: Racism, Multiracial Coalitions and Pathways for Solidarity

Geddes Hall Coffee House

Over the last year, it seems that we experienced a more explicit, expansive attempt to revive explicit racism in our politics, our media, and our interpersonal relations than we’ve seen in decades. The reality of racism in America and its pernicious effects have been revealed once again. African-Americans, Muslim Americans, Latinos, Immigrants, Jewish Americans and many others have found themselves directly under attack interpersonally, institutionally, and sometimes violently.

However, this expansive effort at renewed exclusion may have a silver lining: solidarity. From the Women’s March, to the rise in local social movements, to interfaith solidarity efforts like Moral Mondays in North Carolina, coalitional organizations like the Stand As One Alabama Coalition in Birmingham, and resistance efforts by progressive mayors and city councils against political attacks on their residents, many Americans are coming to see their fates as tied like never before. Drawing from her own research on the rise of multiracial coalitions and activism in the South in a context of renewed anti-immigrant politics, Jennifer A Jones (Department of Sociology and Institute for Latino Studies) discusses the importance of political race and minority linked fate, the promise of a new civil rights agenda, the effectiveness of intersectional activism among the youth, and new pathways to peace and progress emerging at the local and state level.

Sponsored by Center for Social Concerns, part  "Living the Challenges of Peace" theme for 2017-18 academic year.  Simple lunch provided.

Higher Ground Artist: L.A. Theatre Works presents The Mountaintop

DeBartolo Performing Arts Center

Winner of the prestigious Olivier Award for Best New Play, The Mountaintop imagines what happened inside the Lorraine Motel’s room 306 the night before April 4, 1968. In the expert hands of L.A. Theatre Works and an experienced touring cast, Katori Hall’s fictional reimagining begins in Memphis in April 1968, as King finishes delivering his impassioned “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” speech. Exhausted, he retires to room 306 at the Lorraine Motel, where he encounters a young hotel maid with whom he forges an unexpected relationship. During a conversation that ranges from the personal to the political, King finds himself confronting his destiny and the fate of the very nation to which he’s devoted his life.

Ticket information 

Saturday,
January 20

Higher Ground Artist: UZIMA!

DeBartolo Performing Arts Center

Led by Kelly Morgan, founder, and director of local dance and theater company UZIMA! and master African drummer James Riley ’94 this popular event celebrates wholeness, joy, purpose, and life.

Ticket information

Sunday,
January 21

The Princess and the Frog

DeBartolo Performing Arts Center, Browning Cinema

Sunday Family Films presents this Disney instant classic that has been heralded as the studio’s return to 2D animation and, most notably, the inclusion of an African-American princess (a first in the Disney pantheon). Hardworking and ambitious, Tiana (Anika Noni Rose) dreams of one day opening the finest restaurant in New Orleans. Her dream takes a slight detour when she meets Prince Naveen (Bruno Campos), who has been turned into an amphibian by the evil Dr. Facilier. Mistaking her for a princess and hoping to break the spell, Naveen plants a kiss on Tiana -- with unintended results. The pair the work together on an adventure through the bayous to seek the help of a powerful priestess.

Ticket information

Monday,
January 22

Community Building Lunches in Dining Halls

North and South Dining Halls

Members of the Notre Dame community — students, faculty and staff — who are not able to attend the campus-wide luncheon at the Joyce Center are invited to gather with friends and colleagues for lunch in the campus dining halls to continue the day’s conversations. Lunch is complimentary from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. with a Notre Dame ID.

MLK Celebration Luncheon

Joyce Center, North Dome

The third annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Luncheon, sponsored by the Office of the President and the Oversight Committee on Diversity and Inclusion, is an opportunity for campus-wide conversation. Join students, faculty, and staff at this free but ticketed event. This year, former Student Body President, Corey Robinson, and his father, former NBA star and philanthropist, David Robinson, are keynote speakers. Corey will interview his father in a fireside chat format, exploring the family's motivations for service and sharing insights on how they have worked to serve their communities to make a difference.

Faculty and staff will receive information regarding ticket distribution from their department leaders. Students will be able to pick up tickets at the LaFortune Box Office during the week of January 15. There will be shuttles available for transportation to/from the luncheon.

MLK Celebration Luncheon shuttle information

Exhibit: Civil Rights Photography

Snite Museum of Art

After the MLK Celebration Luncheon, stop by the Snite Museum to explore photographs of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and critical moments of the Civil Rights Movement. The photographs reflect the movement's participants’ struggle, courage, and hopefulness. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. described this dynamic as having the faith “to rise from the fatigue of despair to the buoyancy of hope” in his October 1963 speech on the Notre Dame campus. Decades later these photographs continue to resonate with, in the words of Dr. King, “the challenges we face” in the ongoing pursuit of a more just society.

These works of art by celebrated photographers dedicated to recording history in the making - including Charles Moore, Dan Budnik, Danny Lyon, and others - will be on temporary view as part of the University's Walk the Walk Week events.

Wednesday,
January 24

Social Concerns Fair

Geddes Hall

Find new ways to get involved in the South Bend community by connecting with local not-for-profit organizations and service & social action clubs. Learn more and engage in issues such as immigration, sustainability, women's care, homelessness, education, hunger, and health care.

Sunday,
January 14

Exhibit: Modern Women's Prints

O'Shaughnessy Hall, Gallery West

Modern Women’s Prints includes over thirty works drawn from the permanent collection of the Snite Museum, some of which have never been on public view in the Museum. The selected prints are by female artists whose styles are drawn from many cultural traditions, and reflect the full array of printmaking techniques. Among the artists represented are Jennifer Bartlett, Deborah Muirhead Dancy, Grace Hartigan, Lee Krasner, Koo Kyung Sook, and Emmi Whitehorse.

This exhibit runs from January 14th through March 18th.

Tell Them We Are Rising: The Story of Black Colleges and Universities

DeBartolo Performing Arts Center, Browning Cinema

As part of South Bend’s 32nd Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration and Notre Dame’s Walk the Walk Week, this screening will allow for a community exploration of the pivotal role historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have played over the course of 150 years in American history, culture, and identity. Directed by documentary filmmaker and MacArthur Genius Fellow Stanley Nelson, the film reveals the rich history of HBCUs and the power of higher education to transform lives and advance civil rights and equality in the face of injustice.

Ticket information

Featured Media from 2017

Videos

Martin Luther King Jr. Day Commemoration & Walk the Walk Week

Video Message from Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C.
MLK Day Commemoration and Walk the Walk Week

For the second consecutive year, the University is taking time on Martin Luther King Jr. Day and during Walk the Walk Week — which begins on Sunday, Jan. 22 — to both celebrate the diversity that currently exists on our campus and reflect on how might we each take an active role in making Notre Dame even more welcoming and inclusive.

Candles from Midnight Prayer Service

2017 Walk the Walk Candlelight Prayer Service

On January 16, the Notre Dame community gathered for a candlelight prayer service to honor the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration Luncheon 2017

2017 MLK Celebration Luncheon - Walking the Walk: Saying Yes

Judge Ann Claire Williams, Notre Dame alumna and trustee, shared some of her favorite MLK quotes and reflected on how the Civil Rights leader's ideals have been put to action in her life. About 3,000 students, faculty and staff attended the luncheon.

Reflections from members of the Notre Dame community

2017 Walk the Walk Week Reflections

Members of the Notre Dame community discuss what walking the walk means to them.

Photos

What’s Your Next Step?

Tweet what you can do to make Notre Dame a more diverse and inclusive community using #NDwalkthewalk.